NBA Offseason Grades: Pacific Division

gs warriors champs

Welcome to the final part of my 6 part series of NBA Offseason Grades! If you’ve been keeping up with series, I thank you for lending me your time and patience. If you’re just joining us now, well, better late than never!

For the newbies:

I’ve taken it upon myself to evaluate each team’s offseason transactions. I’ve given each team a letter grade based on whether or not I thought they made good moves considering their respective situations. This includes the draft, resigning period, free agency, trades, firings/hirings, and anything else I deem important. Most importantly, I answer the one pivotal question: Are they better?

I’ve unintentionally saved the most entertaining division for last, as today we discuss the Pacific Division. This division has given us so much in regards to entertainment value since June. We’ve seen a team make NBA history, free agency masquerading as a romantic comedy, the fall of an empire, and Vivek Ranadivé doing Vivek Ranadivé things!

This was awesome!

If you missed it:

Atlantic Division Grades

Southeast Division Grades

Central Division Grades

Northwest Division Grades

Southwest Division Grades

Key: 

  • (R): Rookie
  • (DnS): Draft-n-Stash – players drafted, but playing overseas next year
  • (D): Draft-n-Stash player joining the team
  • Bolded Names: Particularly notable players

And we start with our reigning Pacific Division/NBA Champions:

Golden State Warriors: A+

Re-signed: Leondro Barbosa, Draymond Green

Lost: Justin Holiday, Ognjen Kuzmic, David Lee

Acquired: Chris Babb, Jason Thompson, Gerald Wallace

Drafted: Kevon Looney

Other notable moves: N/A

What did they even do?

Exactly.

The disease of more* runs rampant through championship teams across all sports; and the presence of a salary cap keeps this concept a reality. Winning a championship was great, but the iron is hot. And once the team actually climbs the mountain, self goals often take over for team goals. Players want more money, more playing time, more recognition, a bigger role, etc. And so we see key cogs end up taking huge contracts from other teams and then they disappear, with their new money, into irrelevance; all while their former team struggles to defend their title.

*NOTE: “The disease of more” was coined by Don Pat Riley in his book “Showtime.”

Golden State’s team management were able to avoid the disease of more; at least during this offseason.

Of the 5 team free agents that Golden State needed to make a decision on, only 2 were regular rotation guys. Draymond Green may have gotten a huge raise (5-years/$82 million), but his value to the Warriors is actually fairly represented by his max contract; therefore, is exempt from this rule. And Leandro Barbosa (1-year/$2.5 million) is coming back on a very team-friendly deal.

The David Lee salary dump was a way for Golden State management to save money on the luxury tax. Lee is a solid player, but he really didn’t fit in Steve Kerr’s system anyway. He only played 904 minutes in 49 regular season games in 2014-15 (both career lows), and really only had a cup of coffee in the NBA Finals. Lee may be a good guy to have in your foxhole, but the Warriors certainly don’t need him to defend their title.

(Image from USA Today) Yup, the Warriors are bringing back everyone [who matters].

The drafting of Kevon Looney with the 30th pick sparked a little debate due to the prospect’s health issues (he had offseason hip surgery). This doesn’t worry the Warriors, though. They’re super deep and Looney is likely to ride the pine his rookie season anyway. However, he was expected to be a lottery pick before the report of his surgery surfaced the day of the draft. This makes Looney one of those low-risk/high-reward draft picks. And considering the personnel that the Warriors are boasting next season, they’ll have time to wait on Looney.

So management did their part in avoiding the disease of more. The Warriors will be bringing back just about everyone who mattered on an NBA championship team that boasted one of the 4 best regular seasons of all time. Golden State was right not to tinker with the roster. In this case, less is more. And now we’ll wait and see if Steve Kerr can keep the disease of more at bay during the regular season.

The Warriors may not have gotten better from a personnel standpoint; but they’re still a super deep team with championship experience and arguably the hardest home court for opponents to play on. The Spurs may have won the offseason, but the Warriors are still the champions. And like the Nature Boy Ric Flair once said, “To be the man, you gotta beat the man.”

Are they better?: No (But dammit they’re still good).

Los Angeles Clippers:  F-   A

Re-signed: DeAndre Jordan, Austin Rivers

Lost: Matt Barnes, Glenn Davis, Jordan Hamilton, Spencer Hawes, Lester Hudson, Dahntay Jones, Hedo Turkoglu, Ekpe Udoh

Acquired: Cole Aldrich, Branden Dawson (R), Chuck Hayes, Wesley Johnson, Paul Pierce, Pablo Prigioni, Josh Smith, Lance Stephenson

Drafted: N/A

Other notable moves: N/A

DeAndre Jordan was rumored to want a larger role than one he was receiving with the Clippers. Perhaps to finally have an offense built around him. ESPN’s Kevin Arnovitz reported that DJ also grew tiresome of his relationship with Chris Paul , saying:

He [DJ] was tired of Paul’s constant barking and petty gestures, like distributing high-fives to the three other guys on the floor following a timeout but somehow freezing out Jordan.

And so on July 3rd, DJ agreed (in principle) to sign a 4-year/$80 million deal with the Dallas Mavericks.

A few days later in an interview with Bleacher Report Radio , JJ Redick gave the Los Angeles Clippers his own grade on how they handled their offseason to that point. Keep in mind JJ Redick is still under contract with the Clippers for 2 more years…

Is there an F-minus?

Listen, we had one priority this summer and that was to re-sign DJ and we missed out on that, so barring some miracle, [the] makeup of our team is completely different now. He’s such an integral part of what we did, not just defensively but offensively with his screening, his rolling, his offensive rebounds. His presence down low essentially made teams either commit to the three-point line when Blake [Griffin] or Chris [Paul] penetrated or commit to him, and that either opened up lobs for him or threes for guys like me and Jamal [Crawford] and Matt [Barnes].

So he was a huge part of what we did and missing out and having him leave for Dallas gives us a failing grade.

Yes JJ, I make up the rules for this article, so there is such thing as an ‘F-.’

But on the last day of the free agent moratorium, team owner Steve Balmer, Head Coach Doc Rivers, Chris Paul, Blake Griffin, JJ Redick, and Paul Pierce organized a special ops mission to bring DJ back to the Clippers on a long-term deal. They literally infiltrated his house in Houston, Texas, with the intent of locking DJ inside his house until he agreed to sign a contract. They hashed out their differences, and then they played cards until midnight when DJ was able to officially sign a 4-year/$87 million deal to stay in Los Angeles.

It was an emojional day…

with a few laughs…

and some hurt feelings.

It was the most entertaining offseason day in NBA history.

Getting DJ back puts the Clips in good standing grade-wise. I roasted the Mavericks for even trying to sign DJ; so why would I applaud the Clips for going to such lengths to woo their center back?

It’s simple, the Clippers needed DJ to stay.

DJ is actually a perfect fit with the Clippers, his overpaid price tag be damned. He’s the third best player on a contender (ideal role), CP3 and Blake Griffin are running the offense and are very good passers, DJ is the best pick-and-roll finisher in the NBA, and he anchors the defense.

Obviously I was alluding to the fact that I don’t think he’s worth the $21 million+ per year, but it’s not like the Clippers could parlay that money into other players. The Clippers were already over the salary cap before the DJ contract, and the only reason they could pay him big money in the first place was because they owned his Bird Rights. If they lost DJ, they’re not getting anyone else who can replicate what he does for this team; at least not in free agency.

Last post-season the Clippers beat the reigning champion San Antonio Spurs in a 7-game first round series, and were 1 win away from making it to the WCF. Their starting point guard/league’s best point guard turned 30 in May and is entering year 11 of his career (history suggests he will begin to drop off this year or next), and Blake Griffin is just entering his prime. It’s simple, the Clippers are in win-now mode, and the way they went after DJ during the moratorium confirms that notion. DJ walks, and the Clippers are wasting next season.

The Clippers’ Achilles heal in the playoffs last year was their lack of depth. As I mentioned earlier they didn’t have much in the way of cap room, either. General Manager Doc Rivers turned chicken crap into a half-way decent chicken salad by acquiring depth through means of trades, trade exceptions, and minimum contracts.

They traded Matt Barnes and Spencer Hawes to the Charlotte Hornets for the notorious headache that is Lance Stephenson. Stephenson was a triple-double machine 2 years ago in Indiana, but played his way out of the starting line-up in Charlotte via his 38-17-63 shooting splits and just all around bad attitude. I don’t love the risk of bringing in Lance just because of his tendency to rub people the wrong way; but he’s coming into a situation where there’s strong leadership in both the locker room and organization, and he stands a better chance of being kept in check. I can justify the risk given these circumstances. Good move.

The Clippers will miss Matt Barnes’ toughness, his ability to defend multiple positions, and his ability to hit the 3; but the Clips were able to replace Barnes when they signed Paul Pierce to a 3-year/$10 million deal via the tax-payer’s mid-level exception. Pierce brings the same package to the table as Barnes did, plus a proven leadership presence. Pierce is also a native of Los Angeles and won a championship with Coach Rivers in Boston in 2008, so there’s also a little bit of a full circle narrative in relation to this signing. But hey, Pierce is a guy you want in your foxhole.

Doc also managed to pry Josh Smith away from a Western Conference rival despite only being able to offer a minimum contract. Smith is an 11 year veteran who showed a lot of value coming off the bench for the Rockets in the second half of last season; which instantly makes him an upgrade over the 87 year old Hedo Turkoglu. And I imagine the 14 4th quarter points that Smith threw down against the Clips in game 6 to save the Rockets’ season had a little something to do with this signing, as well. But that’s none of my business.

And the Clips also managed to bring in Cole Aldrich, Chuck Hayes, Wesley Johnson, and Pablo Prigioni to beef up the end of their bench. Solid role players at good prices.

Seems like Doc is getting better at this Coach/GM thing.

Are they better?: Yes.

Phoenix Suns: C-

Re-signed: Brandon Knight 

Lost: Earl Barron, Reggie Bullock, Gerald Green, Andrew Harrison (R), Jerel McNeal, Marcus Morris, Marcus Thornton, Brandan Wright

Acquired: Tyson Chandler, Jon Leuer, Ronnie Price, Mirza Teletovic, Sonny Weems

Drafted: Devin Booker

Other notable moves: N/A

I haven’t had a good grip on the Phoenix Suns’ game plan ever since they traded for Isaiah Thomas in 2014 when they already boasted a Goran Dragic/Eric Bledsoe back court; then essentially traded Dragic, Thomas, the Lakers’ top-5 (now top-3) protected first round pick + spare parts for Brandon Knight.

I can’t base this summer’s Suns grade on what happened in past years, but its worth noting I have no idea what’s going on in Phoenix.

Anyway…

The Suns kicked off free agency by signing Brandon Knight to a 5-year/$70 million deal. I personally like Brandon Knight as an all around player, and I think he gets unfairly lambasted based solely on the amount of times he’s landed on the wrong side of a YouTube clip . But he’s a versatile combo guard who does a lot of things well. For some reason his stats dropped after the trade to Phoenix. Granted the sample size was small (11 games in Phoenix compared to 52 in Milwaukee), so it is possible he may have struggled adjusting to a new system on the fly.

(Image from USA Today) With Phoenix committing to Brandon Knight long-term, could Eric Bledsoe be the next Sun to go?

That being said, the Suns went about this all wrong.

Knight was a restricted free agent and the Suns came in with a massive deal in hand without letting the market decide his value. That’s a big no-no when it comes to restricted free agency, unless the player’s name is Kawhi Leonard or Anthony Davis of course.

They would have been better off letting him find a deal in free agency and just matching it. Sure, they may have ended up overpaying him to stick around anyway, but it beats overpaying the guy when the only team you’re competing against is yourself.

The Suns also brought in Tyson Chandler on a 4-year/$52 million contract. He’s obviously being brought in to anchor the defense and serve as a positive veteran leader with championship pedigree; which is good. I imagine Dallas would bring him back if they had a mulligan on free agency. The drawback is that Chandler turns 33 in October, has 14 seasons under his belt, and has had trouble staying healthy his whole career. It’s an alright pick-up at a fairly steep price. I can’t imagine that contract ages well, either.

The Suns also traded Marcus Morris (the lesser twin), and let Brandan Wright and Gerald Green walk in free agency. Mirza Teletovic is a nice pick-up as a floor spacer on the cheap; but other than him, the Suns brought in a cast of role players to fill in the blanks.

I liked the decision to draft Devin Booker at number 13. Booker was arguably the best shooter in his draft class, and should develop nicely in Phoenix’s pace-and-space system.

It’s obvious LaMarcus Aldridge was the apple of Phoenix’s eye this offseason. But LMA chose the San Antonio Spurs, and it appears the Suns didn’t have a contingency plan in case that scenario occurred. So now they find themselves in a situation with no star player and no real direction to go in next season.

The Suns went 39-43 last season (10-17 post trade deadline). Given whom they let walk and whom they brought in, I can’t say that the Suns are better than where they were April 15th. Jeff Hornacek is an under-rated coach who’s been really good at bringing out the best in his players; but even he has his work cut out for him this year in the loaded Western Conference.

I don’t really know where the Suns go from here; but it’s certainly not up.

Are they better?: No.

Sacramento Kings: F

Re-signed:  Omri Casspi

Lost: Reggie Evans, Ryan Hollins, Carl Landry, Ray McCallum, Andre Miller, Eric Moreland, Nik Stauskas, Jason Thompson, Derrick Williams

Acquired: Quincy Acy, James Anderson, Marco Belinelli, Caron Butler, Seth Curry, Duje Dukan (R), Kosta Koufos, Rajon Rondo

Drafted: Willie Cauley-Stein

Other notable moves: N/A

Congratulations, Sacramento Kings! You just took the Most Dysfunctional Organization in the NBA title belt away from the New York Knicks!

Where do I even start?

How about allowing your 3rd head coach in 1 calendar year the opportunity to alienate your franchise center? Then let said head coach keep his job after he publicly looked to trade said franchise center? Yes, DeMarcus Cousins has 3 years left on one of the best bargain contracts in the league; but there’s no chance in Hell he’s sticking around Sac-Town after the 2018 season.

Or how about paying the Philadelphia 76ers a package of Nik Stauskas (2014 – Round 1, Pick 8), a future 1st round pick, and the right to swap picks in 2 future drafts just to take on Jason Thompson, Carl Landry, and their combined $26 million+ salaries over the next 2-3 seasons?

Yes, this trade actually happened.

Forget the fact that they could have used the stretch provision to buy out Carl Landry. Why wouldn’t they just offer this trade to Denver for the right to Ty Lawson? After all, Denver basically ended giving away Lawson to the Houston Rockets following his 2nd DUI of the past year. This would have ultimately been a win-win for both the Kings and the Nuggets had it come to fruition. Instead, Denver dumped Lawson for spare parts and a late first round pick, the Rockets solidified their spot as a contender, the 76ers (briefly) looked like the smartest team in the room, and the Kings ended up tossing their future draft picks away and overpaying for a point guard who’s best years were left behind in 2013.

Speaking of which…

Go ahead and add a 1-year/$10 million contract for Rajon Rondo to Sacramento’s dumpster fire. In case you missed it, last season the Mavericks bet the farm on a Rondo resurgence in the hopes that he would be the missing link to a championship team. Instead, Rondo butt heads with Head Coach Rick Carlisle and played his way out of the rotation in the playoffs. Rondo threw away any leverage he had in a big money contract in free agency, and then the Kings gave him a $10 million deal when no one else even wanted him.

Yes, Boogie Cousins and Rondo will play for a team coached by George Karl. This instantly makes the Kings a must-watch NBA League Pass team. Not for the games themselves; rather for the comedy. Boogie, Rondo, and Karl could end up choking each other out on any given night! No seriously, its going to be Survivor: Sacramento Kings in 2015-16.

A couple other moves I’m not a huge fan of:
1.) Kosta Koufos – 4-years/$33 million. Bleh.
2.) Drafting Willie Cauley-Stein with the 6th overall pick; passing on Emmanuel Mudiay (7), Stanley Johnson (8), and Justise Winslow (10). I love WCS as a prospect; but the last thing the Kings needed was another center. There were better options at number 6, even if they planned on trading Boogie.

I’ll close with this. Pardon me while I borrow/touch-up a quote from Billy Madison that I think correctly reflects the Sacramento Kings’ offseason:

[Sacramento Kings], what you’ve just [done this offseason] is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever [seen]. At no point in your [embarrassing], [franchise debilitating moves] were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational [plan]. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having [witnessed] it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.

Original Version!

Are they better?: No.

Los Angeles Lakers: D

Re-signed: N/A

Lost: Vander Blue, Carlos Boozer, Ed Davis, Wayne Ellington, Jordan Hill, Wesley Johnson, Jeremy Lin, Ronnie Price

Acquired: Brandon Bass, Michael Frazier (R), Jonathan Holmes (R), Roy Hibbert, Lou Williams

Drafted: D’Angelo Russell, Larry Nance, Jr., Anthony Brown,

Other notable moves: N/A

This summer we witnessed the end of an era. Sure, the Lakers haven’t won a championship since 2010, and they last made the playoffs in 2013. But I’m not talking about wins and losses. Down years happen to just about every franchise, and the presence of a salary cap has made it especially difficult to maintain dominance over consecutive years.

Instead, I’m referencing the aura and the mystique that once upon a time surrounded the Lakers franchise. 16 championships, a big market, an LA lifestyle, establishing a legacy; what star player wouldn’t be drawn to these elements? Especially if the money was equal.

After all, good things would just happen to the Lakers throughout NBA history. Stars like Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and Shaquille O’Neal would just fall onto their laps.

But not this time. There was no LaMarcus Aldridge; nor Greg Monroe. Instead their was Brandon Bass and Roy Hibbert.

It’s not just failing to get a star, it’s why they didn’t get a star. Aldridge sat down with the Lakers twice, where they pitched branding, young pieces, and the opportunity to play with Kobe Bryant; but LMA was turned off by LA’s old-fashioned style of play. And he had no interest in being the Pau Gasol to his Kobe Bryant.

Meanwhile Greg Monroe turned down both the Lakers and the Knicks to play for the small-market Milwaukee Bucks because he believed they had the best chance of winning.

It was a bigger loss for the Lakers than it was for the Knicks. The Knicks have sucked for the better part of the last 15 years, and have swung-and-missed on a number of premier free agents. The Lakers aren’t used to this. This uncharted waters.

This summer was one of the last chances for the Lakers to extend Kobe’s career by adding another star, and yet it ended horribly.

I mean, the sum of the parts gained is actually fairly better than the parts lost. Brandon Bass cancels out the loss of Ed Davis, but Roy Hibbert finally gives the Lakers a rim protector. Reigning Sixth Man of the Year Lou Williams is a good pick-up assuming the Lakers keep him in that role and not try to shoe-horn him into the starting line-up with Kobe.

I also LOVE D’Angelo Russell as a prospect. But even D’Angelo drew the ire of Lakers Nation when he had the cajones to call Tracy McGrady the GOAT when one Kobe Bryant is on his team. Take a lap, young fella.

The Los Angeles Lakers now find themselves (temporarirly) stripped of their competitive advantages. Now they are forced to rebuild the old fashioned way like the rest of the teams in NBA: through draft picks and smart business decisions. Truth be told, it’s not the worst way to rebuild in this league. But this was not the gameplan GM Mitch Kupchak drew up. So this is going to cost them.

Are they better?: Yes.


 

 

6 divisions and 30 NBA teams later, and we’ve have completed the NBA Offseason Grades series! I’ll revisit these grades somewhere around the all-star break just to see where each team stands and see how accurate each representation was. Only 7 more weeks until opening night!

Thank you very much to basketball-reference.com , espn.go.com/nba , and hoopshype.com for the stats and information used in this article.

http://SportsRants.com

Is All Forgiven With DeAndre Jordan?

DeAndre Jordan played like he had something to prove last night. How could anyone forget the fiasco during free agency? One day he was with the Los Angeles Clippers, the next day he agreed to become a part of the Dallas Mavericks and in the end he decided to stay in Los Angeles.

The Clippers are now 2-0 as they beat the Dallas Mavericks at home 104-88. Jordan played for 26 minutes and finished with 15 rebounds. He only scored six points but he still had an impact on the game.

There were times when it seemed like some of the Mavericks players were testing Jordan. At one point Jordan and Dallas’ Dirk Notwitzki were going back and forth with one another. Their little situation resulted in three technical fouls.

Was that some type of payback?

With the start of the NBA season that also means the start of Hack-A-Jordan. It was almost as if the Mavericks were desperate and at times they barely let Jordan walk up the court before he was fouled.

I wasn’t expecting Jordan to hit every shot from the free throw line, but it would’ve been nice to see him hit most of them. It’s only the first home game so I won’t hold it against him.

Maybe all is well in Clippers land and fans forgive him for his attempt to move on from the team. Even Jordan acknowledged how if he could go back he would’ve gone about it differently.

When the Clippers play the Mavericks on their home court on November 11, there will be a different atmosphere. The loud boos from the crowd will knock the roof off the American Airlines Center.

Mavericks’ owner, Mark Cuban still hasn’t forgot about how Jordan handled himself. Without naming him specifically Cuban had some strong words.

“You can change the players, you can change the owner, but the Clippers are who they’ve been for the last 30 years,” Cuban said to the media before the start of the game.

It’s ok to change your mind because we’re human we all do it. Just make sure you tell someone about it.

Apparently Jordan didn’t bother mentioning anything to the guy that was going to pay him $80 million over four years. I don’t see Dallas being as nice and welcoming Jordan anytime soon.

Overall the Clippers looked good on the court and led the entire game against the Dallas Mavericks. This seemed like an easy win thanks to Blake Griffin who finished with 26 points, 10 rebounds and 2 assists.

The Clippers shared the ball when they needed to and seemed to have played with a chip on their shoulder. Remember, it was just last year when they blew a 3-1 lead against the Houston Rockets in the Western Conference semifinals.

The Clippers have so much potential; they still have Chris Paul and Blake Griffin. Adding Lance Stephenson and Paul Pierce and a few ex-Rockets players such as Josh Smith and Pablo Prigioni may finally get them to the NBA Finals.

First, they’ll have to get through the Golden State Warriors, San Antonio Spurs and the Houston Rockets, once again.

After all that’s happened, the Clippers and Mavericks may be the new rivalry in the Western Conference.

 

http://SportsRants.com

Bryant’s optimism not as misguided as you might think

(photo from www.variety.com)

Kobe Bryant made headlines last week by proclaiming his Lakers could be good enough to make the playoffs this year. The Lakers were atrocious last year, finishing second from the bottom in the West due to a rash of injuries, but mostly due to a roster that was better fit for the D-League.

And yet, Lakers’ pride has reason to exhale. This year’s team will look nothing like last year’s concoction of misfits. Jeremy Lin, Jordan Hill, Ed Davis, Carlos Boozer, Ronnie Price, Wesley Johnson, Wayne Ellington and Xavier Henry are gone. Mitch Kupchak and the rest of Lakers’ brass were extremely active this offseason, desperately trying to build a contender in what may be #24’s swan song season.

They didn’t reel in a big fish free agent that Laker fans had hoped for. LaMarcus Aldridge nearly chose LA, having met with Lakers’ officials twice before ultimately succumbing to a realistic shot at a title and becoming the heir apparent to Tim Duncan in San Antonio. Instead, they acquired Roy Hibbert, Lou Williams and Brandon Bass, additions that don’t make the purple and gold sudden championship contenders by any stretch of the imagination, but a solid trio nonetheless. Hibbert provides a much needed presence beneath the rim while Williams and Bass will add more scoring options to a team that is too reliant on one player to shoulder the load offensively.

Third overall draft pick D’Angelo Russell is probably the team’s most intriguing offseason addition. Russell, combined with an already promising guard in Jordan Clarkson, make the backcourt in LA a very young and talented one. It will be interesting to watch how Russell adjusts to pro ball. Unlike many rookie guards, the lefty has a smooth touch from the perimeter. Jump shooting is one of his strengths and his ability to finish at the rim shouldn’t be overlooked. And while he isn’t the most explosive player, his backcourt mate may be the Lakers’ most athletic player. At 6’4″ Clarkson entertained audiences throughout his rookie campaign with a litany of highlight reel plays. His length, to go along with that of Russell, could prove to be an under-the-radar weapon in LA.

But as has been the case the last few years, the health of Kobe Bryant remains paramount. If the Black Mamba can stay healthy, the Lakers have a chance to live up to his optimistic outlook. With a solid batch of offseason reinforcements and youthful promise abound, Laker fans can exhale.

http://sportsrants.com

Why the Clippers need to let DeAndre Jordan go

(Credit: Kirby Lee/USA Today Sports)

After falling to the Houston Rockets in the Western Conference semifinals, it became evident that the Los Angeles Clippers need to undergo some serious changes this offseason if the team hopes to compete for a championship. While point guard Chris Paul and forward Blake Griffin both had spectacular postseasons, it was the supporting cast, led by guards J.J. Redick and Jamal Crawford and forward Matt Barnes, that failed to show up.

The Clippers’ lack of depth was something that held the team back all season long. Los Angeles ranked 24th in the NBA in bench points per game, and the team’s reserves ranked 27th in field goal percentage and 29th in efficiency (according to HoopsStats ).

There were moments where the Clippers appeared to have enough depth to reach the NBA Finals. Guard Austin Rivers, son of head coach Doc Rivers, had a series of breakout performances against both the Rockets and the San Antonio Spurs. His 16-point outing on 7-of-8 shooting in Game 4 against the Spurs was a huge reason Los Angeles was able to even the series 2-2 with a 114-105 victory in San Antonio. He also helped L.A. take a 3-1 series lead over the Rockets by averaging 16 points per game through the first four games of the series.

But Rivers reverted back to his old self the final three games, going 6-for-23 from the field and scoring just 15 points. Forward Glen Davis had some moments in the San Antonio series, but he was basically a nonfactor in the Houston series. Forward Spencer Hawes, who was acquired last season from the Philadelphia 76ers, was supposed to have a much larger role on the team, but saw virtually no playing time when the playoffs arrived.

The Clippers’ only scoring threat off the bench has been Crawford, but the team’s lack of depth put a great amount of pressure on him to score. While he averaged 15.8 points per game in the regular season, he was unable to find his stroke in the playoffs, averaging 11.7 points on 38.4 percent shooting against the Spurs and 13.7 points on 34.0 percent shooting against the Rockets.

Simply put, Rivers needs to upgrade his bench if his team has any hope of competing for a title.

Enter DeAndre Jordan.

The 7-foot center has been arguably the most impressive big man over the past two seasons. While his offensive game is still a work in progress, he’s led the league in rebounding two years in a row, posting averages of 13.6 and 15.0 per game, respectively. He’s also been among the league leaders in blocks per game, and his 21.09 PER ranks ninth among NBA centers (according to ESPN’s John Hollinger ). His athleticism and size are almost unparalleled, and at age 26, he’s just entering his prime.

But Jordan will be an unrestricted free agent this offseason, meaning he can sign with any team he chooses. Rivers stated that he plans on offering Jordan a max contract , and if he were to sign the deal, he would remain with Paul and Griffin for the foreseeable future.

However, this would make things very complicated for the Clippers, financially. Both Paul and Griffin are under max contracts until the 2016-17 seasons with player options for 2017-18, and Los Angeles currently has $59.7 million committed to next season’s salary cap (according to HoopsHype ), which is projected to be $67.1 million according to ESPN senior writer Marc Stein . Giving Jordan a max contract would launch L.A. over the salary cap and put the team in serious danger of exceeding the luxury cap, which would result in a luxury tax.

Oh, and that $59.7 million? Not only does that exclude Jordan, but that leaves out Crawford (who has a $5.7 million team option), the Clippers’ best reserve scorer.

If Rivers stays committed to his statement and gives Jordan a max contract, L.A. will almost certainly have to decline Crawford’s option and persuade him to sign for a lot less money. That would be foolish for him to accept, as he could fetch much more money on the open market. Secondly, offering Jordan the max would leave Rivers and the Clippers with little to no money to fill out the remainder of the roster. Ultimately, Rivers is putting his bench in a position to be even worse than it was this season if he stays true to his word.

But if Los Angeles allowed Jordan to sign elsewhere, the team would not only be able to pick up Crawford’s option, but it could bring in higher-quality free agents to fortify an abysmal reserve unit. Paul and Griffin showed this postseason that they are capable of leading their team to victory, but their efforts can only take the rest of the group so far.

The Portland Trail Blazers faced a similar situation last season. While their starting unit was one of the most effective in the league, their bench was one of the worst. So the team brought in former Los Angeles Lakers Steve Blake and Chris Kaman in the offseason and acquired former Denver Nuggets and Orlando Magic wing Aaron Afflalo at the trade deadline. Unfortunately, injuries to a handful of players including guard Wesley Matthews derailed the team’s playoff push.

DeAndre Jordan will be a hot commodity this summer. Teams like the Lakers and the New York Knicks have tons of cap space to unload, while the Spurs and the Dallas Mavericks could also make a push to sign Jordan if they strike out on Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge and Memphis Grizzlies center Marc Gasol. In sum, Jordan could easily fetch a max contract from another team if he decides to leave the Clippers.

For L.A., it may be best to let him walk if Rivers is serious about rebuilding his bench.

http://SportsRants.com

Will Chris Paul ever win a ring?

(Richard Rowe/Getty Images)

Since Chris Paul was drafted fourth overall by the (then) New Orleans Hornets in 2005, the point guard from Wake Forest has been one of the NBA’s best over the past decade. He’s a former Rookie of the Year, an eight-time All-Star, a four-time member of both the All-NBA First Team and the All-Defensive First Team, a six-time league steals leader and a four-time league assists leader. He’s won two Olympic gold medals with Team USA in 2008 and 2012 and his No. 3 jersey is retired at Wake Forest.

From a numbers standpoint, Paul has averaged a double-double in points and assists per game five times in his 10-year career. He’s also averaged at least two steals per game eight times including a career-high 2.8 per game in the 2008-09 season. At just 30 years old, he ranks 16th all-time in assists (6,950) and 24th all-time in steals (1,641).

The man known as CP3 is by all means a superstar point guard, and he’s almost a shoo-in for the Hall of Fame.

However, despite making the postseason seven times, he’s yet to win his first NBA championship. Moreover, he’s yet to advance beyond the second round.

And it’s not necessarily any fault of his own. In his third and final playoff appearance with New Orleans in 2011, he turned in arguably the best postseason performance of his career with an underwhelming supporting cast, averaging 22.0 points, 11.5 assists and a playoff career-high 6.7 rebounds per game while shooting 54.5 percent from the field and 47.4 percent from 3-point range. But it wasn’t enough, as All-Star guard Kobe Bryant and the Los Angeles Lakers bounced the Hornets out of the first round in six games.

 

Things would then get messy for the Hornets. Prior to their postseason elimination, the league purchased the team from former owner George Shinn for an estimated $300 million. After the loss to the Lakers, Paul told the team he would not sign an extension and that he wanted to be traded, with the New York Knicks topping his list . New Orleans attempted to ship Paul to the Lakers in a three-team deal that would’ve sent center Pau Gasol from Los Angeles to the Houston Rockets and netted the Hornets a trio of top-flight players such as forwards Lamar Odom and Luis Scola and guard Kevin Martin. But the trade was rejected by former commissioner David Stern for “basketball reasons”, shocking the organization and generating plenty of buzz throughout the league . Paul was eventually traded to the Los Angeles Clippers for center Chris Kaman, forward Al-Farouq Aminu, guard Eric Gordon and a unprotected 2012 first-round pick via the Minnesota Timberwolves.

Through four seasons in Los Angeles, Paul has helped the Clippers compile a 206-103 record. He’s also led the team to the postseason in each of those seasons. However, the team lost three times in the Western Conference semifinals and once in the first round.

Unlike his time in New Orleans though, Paul has been surrounded by extraordinary talents throughout his tenure with the Clippers including All-Star forward and former No. 1 overall pick Blake Griffin and league-leading rebounder DeAndre Jordan. Los Angeles also brought in veteran forward Matt Barnes, sharpshooter J.J. Redick and high-volume scorer Jamal Crawford to improve the team’s shooting. Lastly, championship coach and future Hall of Famer Doc Rivers was acquired from the Boston Celtics to help bring the Clippers their first title in franchise history.

But even with all these pieces in place, Los Angeles still can’t figure it out, recently choking away a 3-1 series lead to the Rockets in the conference semifinals.

And Paul is still seeking his first conference finals bid.

With the pressure on him to finally break through, Paul performed valiantly this postseason, averaging 22.1 points and 8.8 assists in 12 playoff games while shooting 50.3 percent from the field and 94.7 percent from the free-throw line. He was also responsible for lifting the Clippers over the San Antonio Spurs in the first round after hitting a dagger off the backboard in Game 7.

 

But Paul’s performance against the Spurs will be overlooked by his team’s epic collapse against the Rockets. The Clippers led Houston at home by 19 points in the fourth quarter of Game 6 with 3-2 series lead, but were outscored 40-15 in the final 12 minutes of the game. The Rockets then took Game 7 in wire-to-wire fashion.

With their season now over, the Clippers have a number of issues to address. Jordan will be a unrestricted free agent this offseason and reports indicate he’s seeking a max contract . Paul and Griffin will make a combined total of over $40 million next season, so if Rivers offers Jordan a max deal, Los Angeles would almost certainly go over both the salary cap and the luxury cap. Unless the Clippers decline Crawford’s $5.7 million team option and/or find a way to deal Redick, Barnes and/or center Spencer Hawes, new owner Steve Ballmer will likely be forced to pay the penalty for going over the limit.

Another interesting twist is that Jordan and Paul reportedly had a falling out during the season that could drive Jordan away from Los Angeles. With the Clippers’ tight financial situation, all signs could point to Jordan leaving if these reports are true. And if he does end up signing elsewhere, can Rivers lead the team to a title without one of the league’s best young big men?

Rivers stated after the Game 7 loss that rebuilding the bench will be one of his top priorities this summer . But if he gives Jordan a five-year, $108.3 million max extension, the team’s funds to bring in quality reserves will be almost, if not completely nonexistent. Therefore, it would make more sense for Los Angeles to let Jordan walk if the team truly wants to improve its bench.

Overall, there is a lot of uncertainty hovering over the Clippers, and as the team gears up for another championship-or-bust season, the pressure and expectations will continue to mount on Paul to deliver.

Or if he will deliver at all.

Russell Hodges is an NBA writer for Sports Rants. Follow him on Twitter @russelljhodges

http://SportsRants.com

The Clippers and Spurs Continue to Delight in the NBA Playoffs

(Getty Images/Bleacher Report)

LOS ANGELES- With the series tied at two games a piece, the six seed San Antonio Spurs head to Los Angeles to take on Chris Paul and the number three seeded Clippers.

What is quickly turning into the best series of the first round, the Spurs find themselves in a position that only the Spurs could truly come out of. Looking at the rosters, the Clippers appear to have the clear advantage in regards to age, talent and motivation. However as the world has come to know, never count out Coach Greg Popovich, the ageless wonder Tim Duncan and the supporting cast of Kawhi Leonard, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili.

First Quarter

i-1

Photo from ESPN

The Clippers start fast behind the play of Blake Griffin who goes 3-3 from the floor with seven points, two rebounds and one assist in the first four minuets. Its clear that the home crowd is much more involved, opposed to the earlier games where they seemed uninterested at times; question is will they be able to maintain it. Tim Duncan then manages to stifle the home crowd with a contested layup against DeAndre Jordan.

However the Blake show seems to be in full effect as he soars high above the rim and puts down a vicious slam bringing his point total to 11.  (3:05) A throwback to “Lob City” as Paul find
s Jordan for a posterizing alley-oop with the Spurs now trailing 13-21(15-0 run). The first quarter comes to an end with San Antonio going on a 7-0 run.

 

1st Quarter Score: LAC 27 SA 22

 

2nd Quarter

Patty Mills and Manu Ginobili hit back-to-back 3-pointers and take their first lead of the game with a score of 28-27. The Clippers continue to kill the Spurs with fast break points 12-6. A slow start for the Clippers in the first seven minutes as the Spurs seem to be getting into their grove. (41-42) The “hack a Jordan” begins with 4:39 left in the first, DJ goes 0-2 from the charity stripe. (4:22) Jordan at the line (1-2). 3:59 Jordan at the line again (1-2) with Doc Rivers forced to substitute Jamal Crawford for DJ.

A controversial topic as of late, is the “hack a Shaq” strategy actually bad for the overall state of the game, both sides have compelling opinions. Now with :26 left in the half, CP3 wrestles with Danny Green for a loose ball, with Duncan and Paul then exchanging some brief words after the whistle. Reggie Miller continues to label Paul as a “Pitbull” with the replay airing multiple time on TNT.

la-sp-cn-clippers-san-antonio-spurs-playoffs-l-001

(Image via Los Angeles Times) – Doc Rivers, clearly frustrated with the foul called on Chris Paul at the end of the 2nd quarter.

 

Halftime Score: LAC 54 SA 53 

 

 

 

3rd Quarter

Paul hits the floor, clearly still energized from the tussle at the end of the 2nd half as he fiercely drives the lane and scores on a layup (3-7; 8 points, 8 assists). Furthermore the star from game four; Austin rivers, has only played seven minutes and scored zero points at the 9:27 mark in the 3rd.

Also having a quiet night is Tony Parker who seems to be having trouble finding his range (8:27; 3-10, 7 points, 1 assist). (8:03) And while Blake Griffin has dramatically improved his jump shot, the power forward throws up an ugly 3-pointer to the disdain of Chris Paul. The Spurs Danny Green then swats away a 3-point attempt from Paul who retaliates down the court with a frustration foul against Leonard (SA 60-LA 62).

Photo Via ESPN

Photo Via ESPN

Both teams have gone cold from the floor with the Clippers missing their last five shots and the Spurs missing four. It is moments like this where the Clippers are unable to rely on their limited bench strength, opposed to the Spurs who’s bench rivals no one. With 4:38 remaining, “hack a Jordan” returns but DJ responds(1-2), while also hitting 50% of his free throws on the night. With 3:26 left in the quarter, Doc Rivers is forced to take DJ out of the game as he continues to miss free throws and the Spurs continue to score on the other end. The game takes on a snails pace for the last three minutes as both teams shoot multiple free throws and the Spurs attempt to take the home crowd out of the game. The Clippers end the 3rd 12-6 run as Austin rivers hits a 2-pointer.

3rd Quarter Score: LAC 82 SA 82 

4th Quarter

The Los Angeles fans are back in the game as CP3 breaks the ankles of Danny Green and drives for an astounding layup, with LAC taking the lead 88-85. With both teams now feeling the games conclusion in sight, they continue to push the ball and exchange leads. Clippers players begin to push the ball with Griffin leading the charge, while the Spurs demonstrate how the properly share the rock and catch defenders out of position.

With 9:26 left in the 4th, the game is again tied at 88-points a piece. The Spurs than proceed to go on a catastrophic run, and grab their largest lead of the game (96-103) behind a Boris Diaw 3-pointer. San Antonio has 11 made three’s on the night and Doc Rivers calls a desperation time out. The Clippers manage to come back to within 2-points but Tim Duncan refuses to let Griffin score, delivering a nasty block and helping secure the rebound.

With 6.9 seconds left in the 4th and down by one, Jordan is called for interference with the ball above the cylinder, resulting in a turnover with 4.9 seconds left (108-107). Danny Green is then intentionally fouled, hitting 1 of 2 free throws, with series MVP Kawhi Leonard managing to come up with the rebound, ending the game making two consecutive free throws.

Final Score: LAC 107 SA 111

Game 6: Clippers at Spurs, Thursday 9:30 EST

Shop top Men’s styles in Nike, Puma, Adidas, Reebok, Timberland, Converse, Vans & More! Exceptional Sale products & Free Shipping over $75 always

http://SportsRants.com

NBA Playoffs First Round Preview and Picks (Part 1: Western Conference)

(Image from BouncyOrangeBall.com)

 

As the 82-game round robin has ended, so do the seasons of 14 NBA teams. For some, the season ended in the last couple weeks in which they were not able to do enough to secure a playoff berth. For most teams though, the season ended long before the clock hit 00:0 at the end of game 82.  However for 16 fortunate teams, a new journey has begun; a new beast to conquer. Yes, 16 wins separates them from the Larry O’Brien trophy and a place in basketball immortality. In a league that determines greatness by the rings on your fingers, legacies are often built and broken during these next eight weeks. As the weather continues to warm up, so does the NBA action; and every big time performance, buzzer-beater, and upset win will get lumped into the inevitable “NBA Playoffs: Where Amazing Happens” montage.

Speaking of where amazing happens…

Last year’s first round gave us what I believe to be the most exciting opening round in recent history, as it included an NBA record five game sevens, three of the eight match ups ending with an upset, a series-ending block at the buzzer , and a series-ending 3-pointer at the buzzer .

Some NBA pundits are bearish on this year’s first round of the NBA playoffs. While I don’t anticipate five game sevens, this year’s opening round should still give us some exciting basketball.

Walk with me as I put myself, as well as my credibility out in the open and make my first round picks and predictions.

Part 1: Western Conference

Part 2: Eastern Conference

Western Conference

If the Western Conference playoffs were a reality TV show, it’d be called Survivor: Western Conference. Each team brings a different set of skills to the island. Where the older, more experienced contestants are typically the favorites to win the grand prize, some of the younger contestants have shown the creativity and resourcefulness to make a deep run in the competition. It’s a conference where at least seven fan bases can make a reasonable argument as to why their team belongs in the NBA Finals.

 

And the first round match ups…

 

(1) Golden State Warriors vs. (8) New Orleans Pelicans

Records: GSW 67-15; NOP 45-37

Season Series: GSW 3 – NOP 1

Let me start off by congratulating the Golden State Warriors for finishing the season 67-15, tying the 1991-92 Bulls for the third best regular season record of all-time.

The Warriors bring their MVP frontrunner (Stephen Curry), their coach of the year candidate (Steve Kerr), their super deep/healthy team, and the NBA’s best home court advantage (39-2 at the Oracle Arena) into a first round matchup with the allegedly “happy to be here” Pelicans of New Orleans.

(Image from BasketSession.com)(Left to Right) Tyreke Evans, Stephen Curry, Anthony Davis, Klay Thompson, Jrue Holiday

The Pelicans basically started their postseason on the last day of the regular season with a home game against the reigning champion Spurs. The Spurs needed a win to clinch a 2-seed, and the Pellies needed a win to secure a playoff spot. In stunning fashion, the Pelicans outlasted the Spurs 108-103 in one of the most emotional “play-in” games in recent memory.

The interesting thing about these teams’ season series is that Anthony Davis only played in two of the four games: a 27 point loss in Golden State (12/14/2014) and a 3 point win in New Orleans (04/07/2015). In his two games against the Dubs, The Brow went for 30 points, 15 rebounds, and 3 blocks, and 29 points, 10 rebounds, and 4 blocks.

The Warriors may lead the league in defensive efficiency (98.2), but they cannot stop Anthony Davis from doing Anthony Davis things. The Pelicans face their own conundrum, though: how do they stop the Splash Brothers? Jrue Holiday, a capable defender when healthy, has played only three games since returning from a stress reaction in his right leg. While Pelicans Coach Monty Williams hopes Holiday can start for his squad against the Warriors, history tells us that he probably won’t be that effective, as he still has to get back into “game shape.”

Predictions:

The Warriors will not stop Anthony Davis. The best Draymond Green, Andrew Bogut, and the rest of the front court can hope to do is slow the man down; try to limit his production. The Warriors are a sophisticated defensive team. If Davis is going to put up big numbers, they’ll be sure to make sure their next best players don’t get hot. This shouldn’t be a tall order, considering Tyreke Evans and company aren’t the most imposing of threats.

My prediction for the Warriors is that they’ll lose two home games in their entire playoff campaign. Steve Kerr’s lack of playoff coaching experience may haunt him in certain spots in the playoffs, but not verse the Pelicans. Too much Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, and overall depth will be the demise of the Pelicans.

Warriors defeat Pelicans in 5

 

(4) Portland Trail Blazers vs. (5) Memphis Grizzlies

Records: Por 51-31; Mem 55-27

Season Series: Por 0 – Mem 4

The Portland Trail Blazers sent ripples across the West with their Northwest Division Title. NBA rules mandate that all division winners are awarded home court advantage in the first round, despite their overall record. This explains why the Blazers have a 4-seed when they finished with the West’s 6th best record. The Grizz would have found themselves in the 4/5 match up, anyway (this time as a 4-seed); except they would’ve been paired with the reigning champion Spurs. In retrospect, the Grizzlies might have been the only winners in this fiasco. I’m sure your favorite team would sacrifice home court advantage for one series to not play against the Spurs; “Search your feelings, you know it to be true,” I say in my best Darth Vader impression.

The Portland Trail Blazers were 40-19 and title contenders going into their March 5th match up with the Dallas Mavericks. The Blazers may have won that night in regards to the box score, but they lost when Wesley Matthews went down with a ruptured achilles tendon. The Blazers were already battling injuries all season long, but the Matthews injury was the most devastating. Not only was Matthews their best defender, but he was the leader of the locker room. The Blazers stumbled to the finish with a 10-12 record in their final 22 games.

(Image from FanSided.com) Both Portland and Memphis had title aspirations as late as February. Injuries and sluggish play have sent them back to reality.

The Memphis Grizzlies also started their season strong with title aspirations. They acquired swingman Jeff Green from the Celtics in a mid-season trade to boost their offense. The trade appeared to be just what the Grizz needed, as they went 15-3 in the 18 games following the swap. However, Memphis played .500-ball down the stretch, going 14-13 in their final 27 games. The “can this team score enough points to make a deep run” questions began to resurface with theirs sluggish play down the stretch.

The theme of this playoff match up is ‘injuries.’ With Wesley Matthews out for the postseason, Dorrell Wright sidelined with a broken hand, and LaMarcus Aldridge, Nicholas Batum, Arron Afflalo, CJ McCollum, and Chris Kaman all battling injuries, the Blazers certainly have their work cut out for them. Fortunately for them, the Grizzlies are also a little bit banged up. Mike Conley is questionable for game one, and Zach Randolph and Tony Allen are both coming off injuries of their own.

Memphis has Portland’s number this season, winning the series 4-0. Portland has also gone 1-7 in their last 8 games against playoff teams.  The Blazers are just too hurt right now.

Predictions:

While the Grizzlies may have played .500-basketball down the stretch, they’re still one of the five best defensive teams in the NBA.  Aldridge and Robin Lopez will struggle down low against the best defensive front court in the league. Portland’s lack of depth will ultimately be there killer.

Grizzlies defeat Trail Blazers in 5

 

(3) Los Angeles Clippers vs. (6) San Antonio Spurs

Records: LAC 56-26; SAS 55-27

Season Series: LAC 2 – SAS 2

If there’s any team that should be angry with the Trail Blazers earning a 4-seed, it’s the Los Angeles Clippers.

As I mentioned earlier, legacies are often made or broken in the NBA playoffs. Chris Paul knows this reality all too well. After all, the biggest glitch on his Hall of Fame resume is the fact that he has yet to compete in a conference finals in his career. The NBA’s most offensively efficient point guard has led the league’s most offensively efficient team to a third straight 56+ win season and a 3-seed in the playoffs. Though, I’d be remiss if I didn’t give credit to another key player. DeAndre Jordan’s most dominant season couldn’t have come at a better time. With Blake Griffin struggling to follow up his own breakout year, DeAndre has kept the front court afloat and the paint off limits to any intruder.

(Image from USAToday.com) Doc Rivers has turned DeAndre Jordan in to a top five center worthy of a max contract this summer

The Clippers’ reward for their regular season success: having to play the reigning champion San Antonio Spurs in the first round.

I don’t think the Spurs will lose too much sleep over being a 6-seed. After all, how many times have we seen Coach Gregg Popovich not take the regular season seriously until the final leg? Yes, the Spurs did what the Spurs do best: coast through the regular season, get hot late, and ride that momentum into the playoffs. Following the Spurs cardiac arrest-inducing overtime loss to the New York Knicks on St. Patty’s Day, Pop’s crew went 14-2 in their final 16 games, with wins over the Hawks, Mavs, Grizzlies, Warriors, Thunder (twice), and the Rockets (also twice). Tim Duncan is still showing us why he’s the greatest power forward of all time, and Kawhi Leonard has emerged as one of the best two-way players in the league.

The Clippers drew even with the Spurs after falling behind 2-0 in the season series. Both teams have a win on the opponent’s court to their credit.

Predictions:

The playoffs are often a chess match, and Gregg Popovich understands this better than anyone. The last time these teams faced each other, it was Pop ordering the “Hack-a-Shaq” on DeAndre Jordan, sending him to the free throw line for 28 free throw attempts (DJ made 10 of 28). Look for Pop to continue this strategy to neutralize Jordan’s dominance inside. Coach Doc Rivers will sit Jordan for pro-longed stretches late in games; thus, diminishing the effect of the Paul-Griffin-Jordan Big-3. The Spurs momentum and depth will overpower LA’s talent.

Spurs defeat Clippers in 6

 

(2) Houston Rockets vs. (7) Dallas Mavericks

Records: Hou 56-26; Dal 50-32

Season Series: Hou 3 – Dal 1

Last summer Chandler Parsons agreed to a contract with the Dallas Mavericks, and the Houston Rockets elected not to match the offer. Instead, they brought in veteran swingman and former champion Trevor Ariza to replace the former Florida Gator. James Harden said of Parsons’ departure ,

“Dwight (Howard) and I are the cornerstones of the Rockets. The rest of the guys are role players or pieces that complete our team. We’ve lost some pieces and added some pieces. I think we’ll be fine next season.”

I’d say those are fighting words.

Other notable narratives in no particular order:

  • Veteran point guard Jason Terry was a member of the Dallas Mavericks’ 2011 championship team, and now plays a large role for the Houston Rockets
  • Rockets’ General Manager Daryl Morey and Mavericks owner Mark Cuban have a rivalry that’s been brewing for a few years; since Morey won over Dwight Howard in 2013 and tried to sign Dirk Nowitzki in the 2014 free agency period.
  • The intrastate rivalry probably has something to with it too, don’t ya think?

What James Harden has done one year removed from a putrid playoff performance is unbelievable. The MVP candidate has led his injury depleted team to 56 wins and a 2-seed in a loaded Western Conference, without having Dwight Howard on the court with him for 41 games. James Harden skeptics are quick to argue that he will not be able to carry his Rockets team deep into the playoffs; that the NBA playoffs are not designed for one player to carry the load. A healthy Dwight Howard is exactly what the Rockets need to advance.

(Image from Zimbio.com) Former comrades James Harden (left) and Chandler Parsons (right) will square off for the first time in a playoff series, eager to prove each other wrong

What concerns me moving forward, though, are a trio of injuries for the Rockets that emerged over the last month. Starting point guard and pesky defender Patrick Beverly, back-up center Donatas Motiejunas, and rookie shooting guard KJ McDaniels will miss the entire postseason.

As for the Mavericks…

The 2011 championship band is back together after trading for Tyson Chandler and signing JJ Barea last summer. And the addition of Chandler Parsons last summer was aimed to serve as  a reinforcement on the perimeter. I was one of the people who believed that the Rajon Rondo trade would make the Dallas Mavericks the favorites coming out of the Western Conference. Instead, the Mavs gave up their front court depth for a point guard that’s more stats-oriented than team-oriented, and rocks a 44-35-45 shooting split in his time with the Mavericks.

One final stat: the Dallas Mavericks would be the first team to ever win a playoff series with a point guard who started at least 46 games, shot less than 45% from the field, 36% from three, and 50% from the free throw line. Just saying.

Predictions:

Rondo’s ineffectiveness will offset the Patrick Beverly injury to an extent. Houston’s injuries will keep this series close, as will Dwight Howard’s inability to find a rhythm early on in the match up. The Mavericks will beat the crap out of James Harden every time he draws a foul in the paint, but it’ll be Harden sticking a fork in the Mavericks with his big play down the stretch.

Rockets defeat Mavericks in 7

 


 

That’s it for the Western Conference Playoffs first round preview. Hang tight for my Eastern Conference predictions and picks coming in Part 2!

http://SportsRants.com

Kobe Bryant’s Muse Takes Fans to Unfamiliar Territory

(photo from sportsgrid.com)

Throughout his glorious, Hall-of-Fame career, Kobe Bryant has spoiled his fans year in and year out with a brand of basketball unmatched by most, past and present. What the 19-year veteran has accomplished on the court goes without saying and is recognized among NBA circles worldwide.

What’s also been well-known has been Bryant’s guarded approach towards aspects of life unrelated to basketball. Early on in his career, Bryant tended to shy away from late night festivities, a decision that oftentimes isolated him from his teammates. His relationship with then-teammate Shaquille O’Neal, the polar opposite of the young Bryant, was rocky at best. And when the two would clash, the others usually gravitated towards O’Neal’s outgoing personality.

But as he’s gotten older and figured out how to become a more effective leader, not only have the championships minus O’Neal followed, but it’s brought about a more open Bryant. And as the ending to his career becomes more realistic with each passing injury, the Black Mamba has seemingly made it a top priority to provide fans with a closer look at exactly how he’s come this far, as well as allowing more insight into his unrelenting daily grind against father time. Kobe Bryant’s Muse does just that.

It doesn’t take a Mamba Army enlistment to be able to fully appreciate this piece of work. Bryant goes in-depth about a variety of topics, from his difficult transition to life in the States, to his struggle to earn playing time during his rookie season. The Lakers’ star elaborates about his favorite players growing up, and how he would mimick their moves. He includes behind-the-scenes clips of his rehab and interactions with team doctors and physicians throughout. It’s amazing to hear him discuss his injuries with them.

What also stood out was his emotional stance on his wife’s miscarriage revelation. The fact that his wife had a miscarriage is a surprise to most, and his admittance that he believes he’s at fault was eye-opening. Bryant goes on to describe how fans’ ridicule and taunting fueled him on the court.

After watching the documentary, it’s clear as day to understand why and how Kobe Bryant has become one of the best players of all time. The guy just ticks different. He’s obsessed with winning and goes to great lengths to master his craft. Such an approach to the game simply doesn’t exist anymore.

Midway through, Bryant concedes that he is proud to be able to “sit at the same table as Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson.” He has more than earned that right.

http://sportsrants.com

Lakers May Have Found Their Point Guard

(photo from nba.com)

The struggles of the Los Angeles Lakers have been well documented. Losing Julius Randle in the season opener was seemingly a sign of things to come. Kobe Bryant’s constant battle with father time took another blow, as the future Hall of Famer suffered his third season-ending injury in as many seasons. The Lakers are 13-34, good for last in the Pacific and second-last in the West. As a friend recently put it, the purple and gold are in ‘chill for Jahlil’ mode.

Instead of beating a dead horse by harping on the the team’s porous season, I want to switch gears and focus on the sudden emergence of rookie point guard, Jordan Clarkson. A late second round draft pick, the lanky guard has been thrown into the fire since joining the starting five following Bryant’s injury.

Clarkson has started the last four games, and in three of those games, has had the tall task of matching up against Tony Parker, Kyrie Irving and Derrick Rose. When all is said and done, the rookie from Missouri hasn’t looked the least bit fazed. Clarkson has averaged 14 points and four assists since being named the starter, including back-to-back 18-point outings against Washington and Chicago. Byron Scott is giving the rookie every opportunity to prove his worth. With the season all but lost, and knowing exactly what you have in Jeremy Lin and Ronnie Price, Clarkson’s minutes are rising. The 22-year old was on the court for 37 minutes against Washington, and 43 minutes in the double overtime win against Chicago.

At 6’5″, Clarkson is a prototypical tall point guard. There aren’t many point guards in the league with his size. He’s got Russell Westbrook-like athletic ability and can penetrate with ease. His perimeter game isn’t bad for such a young player. With his team holding on to a two-point lead late in the second overtime against the Bulls, Clarkson splashed an 18-foot jumper, effectively icing the game. He displayed impressive poise down the stretch, unafraid of the big moment.

Don’t get me wrong, by no means am I crowning Jordan Clarkson as the next best thing. It’s been far too small a sample size. But he certainly has the tools to put it all together. His development will be crucial for the Lakers going forward. With Julius Randle on the mend and another early draft pick coming soon, the Lakers’ youth movement is in full swing.

http://sportsrants.com

Even without Kobe Bryant, Lakers Problem is Kobe

Photo Credit: ESPN

Last night the starting lineup for the Los Angeles Lakers was as follows:

PG: Jordan Clarkson

SG: Wayne Ellington

SF: Ryan Kelly

PF: Jordan Hill

C: Robert Sacre

Multiple factors contribute to this atrocity.

Carlos Boozer and Jeremy Lin have been long demoted to the bench, Ronnie Price is just returning from a sore elbow, but far and away the most important factor is Kobe Bean Bryant.

Earlier this week, it was announced that the 19-year veteran Kobe Bryant had a torn rotator cuff and would likely miss the rest of the season. This after playing just six games in 2013-14 due to knee and Achilles injuries.

Photo Credit: Sporting News

Photo Credit: Sporting News

Byron Scott and the Lakers have been careful this year with the all-time great’s minutes, but his body seems to be breaking down at an alarming rate after such high usage in the previous 18 years, not even including all those playoff games including five NBA titles and seven trips to the NBA Finals.

Because he’s Kobe Bryant and you’ll be cast out to dark regions of Hel  for having a problem with anything the Black Mamba says or does, he sent out this tweet after his latest fall to Father Time.

He said #oneluv though, so how could you possibly be peeved at the 17-time All-Star (yes, he got selected as a starter…again).

The efficiency numbers regarding Kobe Bryant are quite interesting.

The far, far inferior Los Angeles team is actually better without the services of number 24.

Their offensive efficiency is +4.1 PPG and their defensive efficiency is a staggering -9.8 PPG without Kobe.

Is this to suggest the L.A. Lakers are better when they can focus on a game plan on not micromanaging the usage of their crippled star? No, and honestly who cares. The Lakers pick goes to the Phoenix Suns (via the Steve Nash trade in 2012) unless the Lakers finish in the bottom 5.

Simply put, they need to suck to ensure their future.

But this isn’t where Kobe Bryant is holding his lifelong team back the most. It’s just…how do I say this nicely without disrupting the fragile equilibrium of the intrawebs…

Nobody wants to play with Kobe Bryant.

Despite giving Kobe a preposterous and uncalled for two-year $48 million dollar extension in 2013, they’ve had as much cap room as anybody else in the league to be a player in free agency. The protected pick to Phoenix greatly restricts them in the trade front, although they have the less valuable Houston Rockets 2015 first round pick for simply letting Jeremy Lin wear their jersey instead of a red one.

Photo Credit: USA Today

Photo Credit: USA Today

Past teammates will tell you, current teammates will never and future teammates are hard to picture, because like I said, nobody wants to play with Kobe Bryant.

The future Hall of Famer is certainly not aging gracefully physically, but the mental side of Kobe and the smack-tongue-and-lick-every-corner-of-his-mouth-in-between-words-when-he-talks is also preventing the Lakers from piecing together life after Kobe, which, if they’re smart, will be this offseason.

Kobe still believes he can play at a high level with the best of them, and that is a large reason he’ll be sporting a coat and tie for the remainder of the season, just as he did after just six contests the season before.

At the end of the day, despite the current travesty of a roster, the Lakers are still a prized destination.

Cough, Kevin Love and Russell Westbrook .

But it has to begin with, among many things, allowing Kobe Bryant to go if he demands on being a number one, two, three or four option on a team with actual competitive aspirations for the future.

Nobody wants to see a legend go out like this, but alas, it is happening to Kobe Bryant.

http://sportsrants.com